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Good Intentions Urges Medical Students to Pursue Marijuana Specialization

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SOURCE Good Intentions

Good Intentions Founder Speaks at Loyola Medical School

Jacobi Talks About Illinois Program and Rules

CHICAGO, Feb. 6, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- With state and voter-approved medical marijuana programs gaining momentum throughout the U.S., medical schools need to take a more proactive role in research, patient study and clinical therapy, according to one of the nation's leading experts in the field and founder of the first marijuana business to open in Illinois.

"At some point in time, every medical specialty was viewed with great skepticism," Tammy Jacobi told residents and medical students Thursday evening at Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine.  "Medical science has always been dependent upon new ideas and courageous practitioners to advance knowledge and improve lives.  Medical marijuana in 2014 is no different than virtually every other medical specialty was at some point in its development, and every new medical specialty has been created and moved forward by people just like you," she told the students.

Jacobi is chief executive officer of Good Intentions LLC, which opened this past August in Wicker Park and helps patients connect with licensed physicians to treat debilitating conditions with medical marijuana and other therapies.  Good Intentions operates a similar facility in Michigan, where a voter referendum legalized medical marijuana in 2008.

Jacobi shared Thursday's rostrum with senior medical doctors and experts in bio-ethics, ophthalmology and psychiatry. 

"Over the past few years, I've been highly focused on the role of doctors in state-authorized medical marijuana programs," Jacobi said.  "It's very clear to me that states are insisting on the participation of physicians in their programs, including the new Compassionate Use Pilot Program in Illinois.  Wanted or unwanted, doctor participation is mandated by Illinois law.  The question now facing physicians is not if -- but how -- they will participate.  Is medical marijuana a patient's right?  Can a patient demand a physician certification if they have a qualified condition?  Is the state improperly intruding into the doctor-patient relationship?  There are hundreds of ethical and legal questions now in play."

Response to Draft Rules in Illinois

Jacobi unveiled her organization's response to the draft rules for the new medical marijuana program issued January 21 by the Illinois Department of Public Health.

"Our suggestions and modifications focus on protecting physicians and advancing patient access for people with debilitating conditions," Jacobi said.  The response was jointly submitted to the IDPH by Good Intentions LLC, and The Thomas Jefferson Project, a medical marijuana patient advocacy organization based in Chicago and is available through Dan Reid at dreid@thedoctorisin.info.

"Physician involvement is a great benefit for patients," Jacobi told residents and medical students at Loyola.  "This therapy is approved in 20 states and many more have pending legislation.  It's time for the medical community to embrace medical marijuana, advance our knowledge about it, and help patients benefit with therapeutic use."

About Good Intentions and Tammy Jacobi

Good Intentions, LLC , is a privately-owned company that operates, markets and manages alternative therapy clinics for licensed physicians in Illinois and Michigan.  It also provides ancillary services related to sanctioned medical marijuana programs for people with debilitating conditions.  Tammy Jacobi – a registered nurse -- founded the company in 2009 and is a recognized expert in the MMJ industry.

Jacobi serves as Chief Executive Officer.  She has extensive experience in the primary business segments of the company, including health care, advocacy, retail, media and overall business management, and is a passionate advocate for medical marijuana and an oft-quoted source on the subject in the media as well as an expert witness before various governmental, legislative and regulatory bodies.  Her advocacy includes access, patients' rights, legal and regulatory matters, cultivation, consumer education, compliance and medical research and science.  She has been at the forefront of 'compassionate use' and related issues for over a decade.

As a Licensed Practical Nurse and Registered Nurse with 15 years of experience in the field, Tammy brings to the company wide ranging knowledge working directly with patients.  Her work as a RN Case Manager with chronically ill patients, certification in advanced wound care and pediatric Intensive Care helped form the medical foundation that ultimately led her to establish Good Intentions three years ago.  Recently, Tammy was named to the medical marijuana Advisory Board at Loyola University School of Medicine.

Tammy's entrepreneurial acumen and ability to identify, conceptualize and bring-to-life new successful business ventures became evident when she founded One Girl's Treasure, a unique concept in the acquisition and re-sale of gently used women's clothing.  Tammy led all aspects of the business, including initial funding, legal, human resource, site selection, store design, marketing, inventory management and all other aspects of the business, and ultimately the successful sale of the company immediately prior to founding Good Intentions.

Tammy also is noted for her ability to coalesce and motivate senior level, professional talent into highly effective management teams.  At Good Intentions, she has amassed a team that includes a Chief Marketing Officer, a General Counsel, board-certified MDs, and medical and other support staff.  She also has recruited and retained additional attorneys, accountants and other professionals, and developed a host of other experts that serve as proponents for the business.

With a nursing degree from Muskegon Community College, Tammy is a frequent lecturer at other colleges in sociology, particularly in classes related to marijuana in health care specific to Michigan.  She is also an expert cultivator.

A true visionary, Tammy has sponsored and led marijuana cultivation seminars, and is a member of the Saugatuck/Douglas Coalition for Sensible Health Care Policy.

CONTACT: Dan Reid
312.316.4313

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.

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