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USPS sends vote-by-mail postcard to households

Election Day is Nov. 3
The mailing comes in the aftermath of questions about whether the agency was up to the task and questions from the White House about the validity of mail-in and absentee voting systems in various states.
The mailing comes in the aftermath of questions about whether the agency was up to the task and questions from the White House about the validity of mail-in and absentee voting systems in various states.(Source: USPS)
Published: Sep. 14, 2020 at 5:29 PM EDT
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(Gray News) – The U.S. Postal Service is out with voting advice seven weeks ahead of the Nov. 3 election. It’s advice that’s prompted a lawsuit in at least one state.

“If you plan to vote by mail, plan ahead,” says a postcard being sent to postal customers nationally.

The information on the card directs the public to the USPS election mail website.

The postcard starts with a pledge.

“If you vote by mail, we’re committed to providing you a secure, effective way to deliver your ballot,” it says.

The mailing gives potential voters a checklist for making sure their vote gets counted:

Start today

  • Give yourself and election officials plenty of time to complete the process ahead of Nov. 3.

Rules and dates

  • These vary by state so contact your local election board.

Request mail-in or absentee ballot

  • Do this at least 15 days before the election.

Follow instructions

  • Check all the boxes. Sign where required. Add all necessary postage.

Get ballot in the mail

  • The USPS recommends you mail your ballot at least seven days before election day.

The postcard ends with a promise that leaves the final responsibility with the voter.

“We’re ready to deliver for you. Make sure you’re ready, too.”

The mailing comes in the aftermath of questions about whether the agency was up to the task and questions from the White House about the validity of mail-in and absentee voting systems in various states.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy testified before both House and Senate committees last month on his management of the agency and changes his critics say will slow mail delivery.

In Colorado, delivery of the flyers has been halted.

A federal judge agreed with Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold that the postcards contain confusing information about the state’s mail-in voting system.

Mail-in ballots don’t have to be requested in the state. They’re automatically mailed to voters.

Coloradans also can choose to vote in person or drop their ballots in secure drop-boxes.

The Postal Service has asked the judge to reconsider his temporary restraining order stopping the mailings.

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