Clinton County lawmaker pleads guilty to stalking, resisting arrest

PLATTSBURGH, N.Y. (WCAX) A Clinton County lawmaker was in court on Thursday facing a slew of charges.

Simon Conroy

Simon Conroy has made the news recently, not for making new laws for his district but for breaking them. Thursday, he took a plea deal that says he's guilty.

Conroy faced charges including criminal trespassing, stalking, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct and criminal possession. The charges stem from multiple arrests last fall where police described Conroy as "erratic" on multiple occasions.

We are still working to gather more information on what led to these charges and have made a FOIA request for paperwork from the courts.

We know on one occasion Conroy created some kind of disturbance in front of the Green Room nightclub and was later transported to the CVPH hospital where he stayed multiple days.

He was also caught trespassing on private property in the city of Plattsburgh.

While in court, Conroy and his lawyer, David Gervais, accepted a plea deal from the Franklin County Assistant District Attorney Meredith Larson. The agreement called for a guilty plea to stalking and resisting arrest, and dropped the other charges against him.

"We're going to face the consequences of those two charges but I am happy to see the rest of the allegations were dismissed," Conroy said.

Conroy offering more clarification on the two charges for his constituents after the hearing.

"In one situation, I was trying to help a friend and another situation, I was seeking more clarification from law enforcement," Conroy said. "Unfortunately, this happened but it doesn't affect my work and I'm still working hard for Clinton County."

Conroy has not yet heard his fate for the guilty plea; that will come March 30 at his sentencing.

"I expect that the next court date should go smoothly, I don't have any concerns with that," Conroy said.

WCAX News reached out to the Clinton County Legislative Office to see if this conviction changes Conroy's lawmaker status. They say it does not because these charges are misdemeanors. Under New York state law, if the conviction was for a felony, a legislator would lose their title.